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Topics: The 50 best beach scenes in the movies - Telegraph

Being part of a national park can be something of a mixed blessing. While this coveted status brings in much-needed funding, it also requires villages to commit to what can be an onerous investment in infrastructure and to sign up to what you might call the "chocolate box" charter – prettifying themselves to draw the punters in.

The village of Ashover, in north Derbyshire, is a hop, skip and a jump from the Peak District National Park, and would fit the description of a tourist honeypot – if only it received lots of tourists. Even though the village shares the same handsome architecture as communities in the national park, it can seem a sleepy place, with lace, knick-knack and novelty shops conspicuous by their absence.

The scenery is similar too: little lanes and quiet footpaths undulating over and down soft hills south of Chesterfield, the fields, predominantly given over to grazing livestock, punctuated by stocky farm buildings and hemmed in by dry-stone walls.

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This is found on page chirrup dating site

Being part of a national park can be something of a mixed blessing. While this coveted status brings in much-needed funding, it also requires villages to commit to what can be an onerous investment in infrastructure and to sign up to what you might call the "chocolate box" charter – prettifying themselves to draw the punters in.

The village of Ashover, in north Derbyshire, is a hop, skip and a jump from the Peak District National Park, and would fit the description of a tourist honeypot – if only it received lots of tourists. Even though the village shares the same handsome architecture as communities in the national park, it can seem a sleepy place, with lace, knick-knack and novelty shops conspicuous by their absence.

The scenery is similar too: little lanes and quiet footpaths undulating over and down soft hills south of Chesterfield, the fields, predominantly given over to grazing livestock, punctuated by stocky farm buildings and hemmed in by dry-stone walls.

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Spitfire Mk IX versus Me 109 G performance comparison, wartime flight trials and data analysis.

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Sex, fun and nuclear apocalypse: beaches provide the backdrop for some of the most memorable scenes in film. Our critics get out their buckets and spades and dig out their favourites

Two men meet on a blustery beach. It's not so much a scene as a moment, a piece of history. Fresh out of the sands of Arabia, Peter O'Toole played Henry II and Richard Burton at his most dashing took on his recalcitrant Archbishop Becket, in Peter Gleville's adaptation of Jean Anouilh's play. Lots of smouldering, and Bamburgh Sands' finest screen moment.

Wish you were here? Forget the gale and the medieval politics, this white sand makes you want to wrap up and enjoy a brisk walk. SC

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Y ou would not expect the world’s fastest car to come from such a beautifully sedate place. The Bugatti factory is in Molsheim, a small town near Strasbourg on the eastern edge of France. Through a large a medieval stone gate you arrive at a beautiful chateau with fields on one side and stables on the other. Next door is a small modern workshop where they assemble the Bugatti Chiron, a car that accelerates so quickly you genuinely feel your eyeballs being pushed back into their sockets.

T his is a chance to try out the Chiron in its home environment, and also to witness the unveiling of the latest Bugatti-inspired watch from Parmigiani , the Swiss watch company that has been in partnership with the supercar maker since 2004.

It's here at this chateau that Ettore Bugatti, who founded the car company in 1909, entertained potential customers. Bugattis won countless races in the 1920s and 1930s, and Ettore prided himself on selling his private clients the exact same cars that were being driven to victory in those early Grand Prix races.

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We were both young exiles from Uganda when we wed. Imagine that — having to settle into a new land and new marriage. It made us intensely close and completely reliant on each other.

Then after 20 years it was over. He was in such a hurry to leave and to move in with his lover that he left behind our precious vinyl collection.

I listen to the records sometimes, now bumpy and scratched, and remember how he taught me to carefully wipe each before putting it on the turntable. He bought me all the Fleetwood Mac LPs.